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Intestinomicina Bone Marrow Side Effects

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) believes the antibiotic Intestinomicina, which contains the chemical chloramphenicol or chloramphenicol palmitate ester, might cause bone marrow toxicity.

What Is Intestinomicina?

The El Salvadoran pharmaceutical company, Laboratorios Lopez, manufactures Intestinomicina and exports it to the United States to treat diarrhea and gastrointestinal infections. Intestinomicina was first sold in 1949 as Chloromycetin and was one of the first mass-produced antibiotics.

Owing to its cheap manufacturing costs and effectiveness against many types of bacteria, developing countries tend to use Intestinomicina more than wealthier states, which are concerned about chloramphenicol’s side effects and ineffectiveness due to increased bacterial resistance. Chloramphenicol works by inhibiting protein formation by binding to bacteria’s cell structures.

In July 2012, Laboratorios Lopez withdrew oral forms of Intestinomicina from U.S. markets due to safety concerns. Until then, consumers could find Intestinomicina in grocery stores specializing in Central and South American products. The Spanish chemical name “chloramfenicol palmitato” appeared on the product’s label, along with “chloramphenicol” in English. According to the FDA, Intestinomicina also contains other antibiotics such as Neomycin and Sulfonamides (called “sulfa drugs”), which can cause adverse side effects as well.

Intestinomicina Might Cause Bone Marrow Toxicity Side Effects

The FDA believes Intestinomicina can cause bone marrow toxicity, specifically bone marrow suppression and aplastic anemia. Symptoms of bone marrow suppression include:

  • Anemia due to reduced red blood cell count
  • Spontaneous severe bleeding due to lack of platelets
  • Susceptibility to fatal infection due to lack of white blood cells

Bone marrow suppression can usually be reversed by ceasing use of Intestinomicina.

Aplastic anemia causes similar symptoms to bone marrow suppression, but medical science cannot reduce its effects as easily. The condition is unrelated to the dose of Intestinomicina and is more likely to be fatal. Patients with blood disorders such as anemia, reduced white blood cell counts, or hemophilia are at greater risk than the typical person.

The other compounds Intestinomicina contains, Neomycin Sulfonamides (sulfa drugs) can also cause potentially life-threatening hives and allergic reactions.

The FDA did not report any known fatalities due to Intestinomicina use in the United States, but it advises anyone who owns the product to cease use immediately and talk to their doctors.

RLG’s Intestinomicina Lawyers Will Make Things Easier

The process of demanding compensation for the harm you’ve suffered can be complicated, even if it doesn’t seem fair that you should have to go through even more trouble to be made whole again. The Intestinomicina lawyers at the Rottenstein Law Group believe that obtaining legal satisfaction from those who harmed you shouldn’t require more hardship. That’s why we do everything we can to streamline the process, and we will file an Intestinomicina lawsuit on your behalf if necessary. RLG will also keep you up to date on any Intestinomicina class action lawsuits, FDA Intestinomicina warnings, and Intestinomicina FDA recall announcements. If you have taken Intestinomicina and believe it harmed you, contact RLG today.

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