What if I’ve taken only a generic version?

In recent years, thousands of patients who have developed severe side effects during or after taking the drug Accutane(or a generic version) have brought legal actions against the drugs’ respective manufacturers, seeking compensation for various injuries suffered.

Accutane was developed and manufactured by Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. for the treatment of severe acne. Unfortunately, the active ingredient—isotretinoin—has been found to lead to debilitating side effects, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, birth defects, and psychiatric disorders, including increased risk of suicide. Roche ended sales of Accutane in June of 2009, in part because of the cost of defending lawsuits brought by injured patients. But several generic versions of the original drug are still being sold in the United States.

  • Amnesteen (manufactured by Mylan)
  • Claravis (Barr)
  • Clarus (PremPharm)
  • Decutan (Actavis)
  • Izotek (BlauFarma)
  • Oratane (Genepharm Australasia)
  • Sotret (Ranbaxy)
  • Roaccutane (Hoffman-La Roche)

Because the generic counterparts of brand-name drugs contain the same active—and dangerous— ingredient, they can all cause the same life-threatening side-effects. So it doesn’t matter if you’re taking—or you’ve taken—actual “Accutane.” What matters is whether you’ve taken isotretinoin, and whether you’ve been injured.

If the manufacturer of a drug negligently designed or manufactured a product, or failed to warn the public about possible dangers, then that manufacturer will be held legally responsible and made to pay compensation for your medical bills, lost wages, and other losses. So if you’re suffering from any of the known side effects of Accutane—or any generic version—and you’ve suffered from severe side effects, let the Rottenstein Law Group know. The knowledge, experience, and preparation of RLG’s lawyers will make seeking compensation for your pain as painless as possible. You’ve taken enough. We’ll take it from here.

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