How do I know if I’ve taken one of these?

Accutane is the brand name of the drug isotretinoin. From 1982 to 2009, doctors prescribed Accutane to more than 13 million patients for the treatment of severe acne. Many of these patients developed devastating side effects from the drug, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, weak bones, kidney stones, psychiatric disorders, and/or birth defects. This circumstance led the manufacturer of Accutane, Hoffman-LaRoche, Inc. (“Roche”), to pay more than $56 million in damages (so far) to injured patients.

In June 2009, Roche ended sales of Accutane in the United States. Even though Accutane is no longer marketed in the U.S., generic forms of isotretinoin continues to be sold under the following names:

  • Amnesteem
  • Izotek
  • Claravis
  • Oratane
  • Clarus
  • Sotret
  • Decutan
  • Roaccutane

Because the original manufacturer of Accutane knowingly and fraudulently concealed the dangers of the drug, if you took this medication for the treatment of acne and developed any of the known side effects, you might be eligible to take legal action against Roche and receive monetary compensation for your harm suffered. Likewise, if you took or are currently taking a generic form of isotretinoin and have suffered severe side effects, you might have a legal claim against your medication’s manufacturer.

The easiest way to determine if you are currently taking isotretinoin is to check the label on your medication and look for the name “Accutane” or any of the generic drug names listed above or the word “isotretinoin” itself.

If you are unable to determine what medication you are taking from the label, speak with the doctor that prescribed the medicine to you. If you are no longer taking acne medication but were in the past, ask your doctor(s) to check your records to see if you were prescribed any form of isotretinoin.

If you are or were ever taking Accutane or isotretinoin and you’ve suffered severe side effects, the Rottenstein Law Group will help you demand compensation from the drug’s manufacturer for your harm—promptly and efficiently. You’ve taken enough. We’ll take it from here.

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